Hobbit review from 1938

This is so fascinating! Thank you to yeoldenews.tumblr.com for digging up this old Hobbit review from The Frederick Post on March 17, 1938:

“The Hobbit is humorous and original; and packed from cover to cover with hair-raising thrills and magic,” says Olive Roberts Barton. Do you think she had any idea, now on the 75th anniversary of the book, that it would be turned into one of the most anticipated feature films of all-time?

Do you agree with Barton’s take?

Advertisements

TheOneRing.Net’s comprehensive trailer review

This is as good as it gets for trailer reviews. TheOneRing.Net, which has always been the best LOTR/Hobbit resource for fans on the web, does a complete breakdown, scene by scene, over NINE pages. We highly recommend you check it out!

Here’s an excerpt:

The following screen caps and commentary are not confirmed and only speculation by the staff at TheOneRing.net. We plan on providing additional updates and insights as staff chime in – so keep this page bookmarked!

And a special note: MAJOR SPOILERS AHEAD!!!! And Click the images to see larger versions

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey - Trailer 2 - Click for Larger Version

Gandalf: Far to the East, over ranges and rivers…

Elessar: Another beautiful look at what New Zealand has to offer.

Calisuri: One of the days, we all need to get our butts to Middle-earth…err…New Zealand. Simply breathtaking.

JW: You can tell in this trailer that they’re making it known that New Zealand is back as Middle-earth, an important selling point, as New Zealand was as much a cast member as any of the people in The Lord of the Rings films, and people will come back to see more of it as MIddle-earth in the Hobbit films. Just imagine how different things would be if those plans to move production away from New Zealand would have happened! We’re so fortunate everything worked out for this project to be done the right way.

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey - Trailer 2 - Click for Larger Version

Rumour grows of a shadow in the east, whispers of a nameless fear. In Dol Guldur, an ancient evil lurks?

Elessar: Dol Guldur look as creepy from a distance as I could have imagined it would look.

Calisuri: Wow – what an amazingly well conceived view of Dol Guldur. Very similar to Weathertop, but much cooler!

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey - Trailer 2 - Click for Larger Version

Calisuri: Pretty sure we could not get through a trailer without some kind of ‘running’ across a landscape shot.

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey - Trailer 2 - Click for Larger Version

Entmaiden: very reminiscent of the moment between Frodo and Gandalf in Fellowship. Nice shot to bring the audience back into Middle-earth. Of course, some of us never left :)

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey - Trailer 2 - Click for Larger Version

Thror’s Map of the Lonely Mountain is revealed.

Entmaiden: the Map! So excited. I saw the display at Comic Con at the WETA booth, and it is indeed awesome.

Calisuri: I’m expecting a lot of stockings to be stuffed with map replicas this holiday season! Now if they can get the Moon Letters to work, they’ll make an additional billion dollars!

JW: I was so excited eleven years ago to see this map in The Lord of the Rings – especially to have Gandalf look at it with such interest. Glad to see it in the trailer, and it will be fun to see it in use in The Hobbit films.

Keep reading here!

Why Gandalf and Galadriel makes sense

There has been uproar from some people about the hinted Gandalf-Galadriel romance in the Hobbit trailers and pictures. Is this a case of a studio looking to cash in on the sentimental crowd (a la, playing up the Aragorn-Arwen dynamic in LOTR), or could a legitimate case be found for it in Tolkien’s writings?

Well, the user Arvedui makes a spectacular case FOR it in a middleearthecenter.com forum, an argument so intelligent and sound, we simply had to reproduce it for you below. These are Arvedui’s arguments on the forum, not ours:

With the official release of the Hobbit trailer to the public last month, the Tolkien community was revived and revitalized almost overnight. Did your eyes light up when the familiar melody of Concerning Hobbits started? Did your jaw drop when the main theme kicked in about mid-trailer? *Mountains spinnin’ round the dwarves Horses spinnin’ round the dwarves*… Chances are you’ve come across this post just as excited for the movie as I am- drooling for more, but at the same time confused and even a little disappointed at the particular “scene of interest.”

When I first watched the trailer I was also confused. After some thinking -granted Im probably the largest LOTR fanboy and within 100 miles- I realized the trailer was still epic and that nothing Peter did was out of line. Today I venture to say the Galadriel-Gandalf scene is perfectly justified. Jackson had [at least I think] more in mind than appealing to a specific demographic.

Brace yourself, Im about the throw a bunch of Elvish words at you.
Gandalf, as we all know, is a wizard belonging to the Order of Istari, a group that also includes Saruman, Radagast, and the Blue Wizards Allatar and Pallando whom we don’t really hear about. What’s important about this fact is that the Istari were maiar. Many people like to call the maiar “demi-gods.” Others like to think of them as angels. In either case, they are defined by J.R.R. Tolkien as “Holy Spirits” that took part in the creation of the world. That’s right, Gandalf took part in the creation of Middle-Earth. He’s tremendously awesome and powerful. The five maiar were sent by the Valar (Greater Holy Spirits) to aid the men of Middle-Earth in the coming fight against Sauron. They arrived in Middle-Earth in the form of old men early in the Third Age, about 2,000 years before the Hobbit Epic begins.

Why am I telling you all this? In case you haven’t realized it yet, this not only means Gandalf was an extremely old soul- tens of thousands of years old at the least, but it also means he had an opportunity to inhabit the land known as Valinor (Essentially Heaven on Earth.) It was entirely accessible to normal living individuals for most of time, but forbidden to all but the elves. Galadriel lived in Valinor for about 1,400 years, meaning she had 1,400 years to mix and mingle with the various celebrities of the land, including the future wizards and even the infamous Melkor (Sauron’s master.)

There is no reason to believe that Gandalf (known back then as Olorin) did not meet Galadriel, or that they did not develop a acquaintanceship, friendship, or even semi-romantic relationship- she wouldn’t meet Celeborn for more than a millennium. What I underlined in the text above is incredibly important. Gandalf actually ages very slowly. He’s in the form of an old man not because of his actual age, but because that was the form he and the other Istari took up in order to appear more wise and trustworthy to the men of Middle-Earth.

He probably took on a form something along these lines for most of his worldly life:

When Gandalf arrived in Middle Earth much much later, Tolkien indicates that Galadriel trusted him more than the other Istari. She thought he should be head of the order over Saruman. For a reason beyond sheer instinct? The proposition seems plausible.

When we see Galadriel in the LOTR she’s about 7,000 years young. She is also extremely wise and powerful, perhaps on a level close to -if not on par with- Gandalf’s. (After all the Istari are forbidden from exercising their full power and will.) Gandalf and Galadriel are both members of the White Council, they’ve known each other virtually forever, and Gandalf is actually a lot sexier than wise-old-man form. Perhaps we should reconsider our opinion of Peter?. Sometimes he knows what he’s doing

Wow … what an amazing case. Consider us sold! What do you think?

Hobbit trailer review – Fantasy in Motion

We came across this extremely well-written review of the newest Hobbit trailer, which is really worth the read. Here are James of Fantasy in Motion’s words:

The first thing that strikes me from watching this trailer is how different this trilogy is going to be from The Lord of the Rings. Where LOTR focused on the hopeless, desperate fight against Sauron, this movie looks like it’s centred on adventure, high jinks and mystery. It seems to have a great sense of humour, too; something LOTR also had in a poignant sort of way. Of course, you’d need the movie to have that humour, with a band of dwarves and a hobbit driving events.

Not just any hobbit, mind you. This one’s played by the fantastic Martin Freeman, well loved in the UK for his roles in The Office and Sherlock. This man has a natural talent for bringing warmth and a sense of reality to his characters. His face conveys every emotion known to man and he has a really likable “every man” kind of way about him. He’s going to do this character justice and it looks like he’s managed to still keep Ian Holm’s older Bilbo appearance from LOTR relevant and believable.

Now, onto the internet’s favourite Hobbit-related topic… Gollum returns! But wait, it’s not just the old CGI Gollum as you once knew him! This one’s… the precioussssss.

Read the rest of James’ review here!